Nov 16, 2018  
Academic Catalog 2017-2018 
    
Academic Catalog 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Liberal Arts: Mathematics and Science

  
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    LAMS200 The Universe 3 cr.


    A study of how the basic laws of physics and astronomical observations lead to an understanding of the universe as a whole.

    Prerequisites: FRSM100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    LAMS203 Physics of Music 3 cr.


    This course uses principles of physics to understand musical instruments, scales, and chords. Required background: students must be able to find notes from written music on an instrument of their choice. The course draws upon algebra.

    Prerequisites: FRSM100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    LAMS206 Biomimicry 3cr


    Biomimicry is the study of the structure and function of biological systems as models for the design and engineering of materials. In this course, students become acquainted with basic concepts in biology, physics and engineering. Building upon this foundation, the course treats how designers solve design problems by mimicking nature.

    Prerequisites: FRSM100

    Lecture
    Sustainability Content
    Undergraduate Elective
    Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    LAMS208 Bacteria Assassins 3cr.


    Almost everyone has taken antibiotics at some point during their lives and we read every day about deadly “superbugs” that are resistant to antibiotics. But what does this resistance mean and how did we get here? The course examines the antibiotic resistance problem and an often-touted possible alternative, bacteriophages. Bacteriophages are viruses of bacteria and were discovered exactly 100 years ago during the First World War. Students examine and synthesize the biology, history, ecology, and applications of these two types of bacteria killers to better understand the treatment of bacterial infections today and what may come in the future. This course helps students understand current events and science relevant to their lives - such as on antibiotics and antibiotic resistance, emerging diseases (such as Ebola), and the human microbiome. No laboratory experience is required.

    Prerequisites: FRSM-100

    Lecture
    Sustainability Content
    Undergraduate Elective
    Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    LAMS209 Wetlands Science and Policy 3cr


    This course is intended as a rational approach to
    wetland conservation balanced with responsible
    development. People need to live somewhere and to
    draw water from somewhere.  But wetlands serve
    many vital functions and oftentimes are highly
    valuable ecosystems that should be protected. In
    the course, students gain an interdisciplinary
    knowledge of wetland definitions, classification
    systems, origins, and natural processes of
    wetland environments. We discuss wetlands across
    the globe, including boreal, temperate, and
    tropical climates. We investigate hydrology,
    soils, and vegetation and their relationship to
    ecosystem processes, societal values, and
    management.  We examine human use, modification,
    exploitation, jurisdictional delineation, and
    management options, along with legal and
    political aspects of wetlands. This is a broad
    course, also encompassing forestry, coastal
    management, energy, climate change, agriculture,
    history, and ecosystem succession. We will
    attempt four optional field trips, weather
    permitting, in our field experience weekend.

    Prerequisites: FRSM-100

    Lecture
    Spring
  
  •  

    LAMS211 Energy in the 21st Century 3cr


    Oil, gas, and coal are polluting, non-renewable
    resources and society must reduce their
    dependence on these fossil fuels.  Alternative
    energies are non-polluting, renewable and are
    therefore highly desirable. This course takes a
    non-traditional approach in that it includes the
    benefits of fossil fuels, and delves into the
    stumbling blocks to implementing the following
    alternative energy technologies:  hydropower,
    wave power, biomass, solar, geothermal, wind,
    hydrogen and nuclear energies.  Science,
    technology, policy, and societal concerns will be
    discussed in a seminar style where students are
    responsible for researching and presenting each
    type of energy.  We will also discuss the “smart”
    use of energy, as well as the storage,
    transportation, housing, and consumption of
    energy.  We will conclude by discussing and
    creating potential policies for the expedited
    phasing in of alternative technologies, including
    regional, strategic, health, safety, and
    environmental concerns.  Students will leave the
    course with a depth of understanding of the
    technological and policy-based obstacles to
    alternative energy but also having a clear
    understanding of the pressing nature of this
    transition.

    Prerequisites: FRSM-100

    Lecture
    Spring
  
  •  

    LAMS240 Biological Form and Function 3 cr.


    An examination of the importance of shape, or form, to biological function. Students explore selected examples at several levels of organization (molecule, cell, individual, community) in a variety of organisms (viruses, bacteria, plants, fungi, invertebrate and vertebrate animals, embryos and mature forms). The course teaches fundamental concepts of biology and prepares students to compare biological and artistic form and function.

    Prerequisites: FRSM100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    LAMS267 Natural Disasters in a Global Environment 3cr


    Do you have an interest in what causes natural
    disasters? Come join us! Natural disasters
    currently cost the world United States $175
    billion USD per year. Fortunately, we have the
    knowledge to significantly reduce these
    costs.Unfortunately, political and cultural
    trends will cause disasters to occur more
    frequently and ferociously. This course provides
    an overview of the causes, locations, and effects
    of natural disasters. You can learn about:
    earthquakes,volcanoes, tsunami, wildfire, floods,
    landslides, pandemic diseases, hurricanes,
    tornadoes, famines and droughts,meteorite
    impacts, and climate change. We will investigate
    recovery and rebuilding efforts and how loss of
    life and
    property damage can be minimized by implementing
    scientific knowledge, through the lens of
    historical case studies, as well as lively,
    hands-on labs, and field trips!

    Prerequisites: FRSM-100

    Lecture
    Fall
  
  •  

    LAMS320 Environmental Science 3 cr.


    A study of the principles of ecology, a science intertwining many biological and physical science disciplines. The course distinguishes the scientific, technological, and social domains. It treats complex human impacts and environmental concerns (such as biodiversity, population size, food and energy resources, air and water pollution, waste management, recycling, and sustainability) and raises issues of environmental ethics, risk assessment, and policy planning.

    Prerequisites: FRSM100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse and Sustainability Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    LAMS322 Animal Sex, Biodiversity and Gender 3cr.


    This course explores the vast diversity of reproductive and mating strategies, sex roles, gender and sexuality in animals and nature. This course takes an integrative and comparative approach to survey the diverse morphological, behavioral, physiological and ecological aspects of sex and reproduction. The course treats the evolution of sexual and asexual reproduction, focusing on ecological and evolutionary factors that influence and constrain biodiversity. Students critically examine the scientific evidence that supports and questions the framework of sexual selection and alternative theories. Students consider and evaluate traditional and emerging forms of scientific communication regarding evolutionary biology and sexual diversity.

    Prerequisites: FRSM100

    Lecture
    Sustainability Content
    Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    LAMS324 Sustainabilty Science 3 cr


    What is the nature of sustainability? How can we learn from and with nature, its biological
    diversity and ecosystems, to become more resilient? Practical examples, field visits,
    readings, and discussions will give students the opportunity to learn about emerging
    interdisciplinary sciences and solution-driven technologies based on green chemistry and
    biomimicry. Through explorations of the water-energy-food nexus, adaptations to climate
    change, and sea level rise, students can explore how we can become self-sustainable in the era of
    Anthropocene. The intention of the course is to give students a greater understanding of how
    science can inform public policies. In addition, attention will be paid to how science relates to
    art and design making, and vice versa.

    Sustainabilty Content
    Fall and Spring
  
  •  

    LAMS325 Desert Science Travel Course 3cr


    This domestic travel course will provide an introduction to the biodiversity of flora and
    fauna of the deserts of the Southwest U.S. through on-site immersion, camping and field
    explorations. This course is a hands-on, novel exploration of the integration of science,
    nature, and art. Through scientific methodology, close observation, and art-making in the field,
    we will conduct research on ecological, behavioral, and morphological aspects of desert
    flora and fauna in their natural habitats. The unique wildlife and distinct habitats of the
    Southwest deserts have long been a source of wonder and inspiration for naturalists,
    biologists and artists. The starkly varied environments of the Chihuahuan and Sonoran
    Deserts (in NM and AZ) offer a unique opportunity for artists to get hands-on biological research
    experience in some of the world’s most unique ecosystems. The Chihuahuan and Sonoran Desert
    regions have the highest levels of species endemism in North America (over 2000 species of
    plants and animals found only in these eco regions). This course takes an interdisciplinary
    approach by creatively combining various methods of field biology data collection and art-making
    to conduct novel, collaborative Field BioArt research. The Chihuahuan and Sonoran deserts’
    pristine, unique, and abundant wildlife is made accessible by the well managed and protected
    National and State Parks in New Mexico and Arizona. The natural habitat will be our
    studio+lab to develop and explore innovative, creative methods of biological inquiry and
    hybrid, experimental art.

    Prerequisites: LALW-100 & FRSM-100

    TRAVEL COURSE
    Sustainabilty Content
    Fall Only
  
  •  

    LAMS326 Experimental Biology and Hybrid Research 3cr.


    This course will provide an introduction to experimental biology and biological research in a
    laboratory setting.  This course is a hands-on, novel exploration of organismal and experimental
    biology through scientific methodology, close observation, experimental design, and data
    collection.  We will conduct morphological, physiological and behavioral research on various
    flora and fauna in a lab work space.  This course takes an interdisciplinary approach by creatively
    combining various methods of experimental biology data collection and art-making to conduct novel,
    collaborative BioArt and hybrid research.  The lab+studio will facilitate the development and
    exploration of innovative approaches to biological inquiry using various observational,
    descriptive, experimental methods, including data dissemination/science communication.

    Prerequisites: FRSM-100

    Fall Only
  
  •  

    LAMS400 Directed Study Math/Science 3 cr.


    A Liberal Arts directed study is a research project selected by a student in a Liberal Arts discipline. Typically, the study results in a research paper of thirty plus pages or the equivalent, as agreed upon by the faculty member supervising the project. Because of its advanced nature, a Liberal Arts LAMS directed study is open only to seniors and is limited to one per semester. No more than two Liberal Arts directed studies may be counted toward Liberal Arts degree requirements. Students seeking to register for a LAMS directed study must execute a directed study proposal form that describes the proposed project, includes a bibliography, and describes the final project. Liberal Arts directed studies proposals require the approval of the Liberal Arts Department chair.

     

    Prerequisites: FRSM100

    Lecture/Seminar
  
  •  

    LAMS401 BioAesthetics and the Human Animal 3cr


    This course explores aesthetics in nature and the
    evolutionary processes of sensory drive and
    natural and sexual selection. The course will
    critically examine both anthropocentric and
    ecological schemes on the aesthetic diversity of
    nature, focusing on the creative agency of
    non-human organisms and objective and subjective
    models of inquiry. The course evaluates and
    challenges historical,contemporary and emerging
    perspectives on what is art, who/what can create
    it, and on interactions between the science and
    art. Through a combination of discussion, guest
    lectures and collaborative projects students will
    explore various topics focused around the
    biological and evolutionary bases of creativity,
    art and design.

    Prerequisites: FRSM-100

    Seminar
    Spring
  
  •  

    LAMS402 Eating and the Environment 3cr


    Eating and the Environment focuses on the impact
    that our daily food purchases and consumption
    make on the environment and our health.  In the
    class, we will examine major themes related to
    both industrialized and sustainable agriculture,
    including: soil resources and pollution; water
    and air pollution; pesticides, herbicides and
    fertilizers; the farm bill; tropical
    deforestation; food additives and nutritional
    supplements; food safety and emerging infectious
    diseases; meat and dairy sustainability
    ramifications; GMOs; and climate change. This
    course gives students the tools they need to
    understand what constitutes environmentally
    friendly and healthy food. Choosing these leads
    to a higher quality of life in many ways.  There
    is no bigger impact on Earth than agriculture.
    And food consumption has the single largest
    impact on our health.

    Prerequisites: FRSM-100

    Seminar
    Spring