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Academic Catalog 2017-2018
Massachusetts College of Art and Design
   
 
  Dec 13, 2017
 
 
    
Academic Catalog 2017-2018

Courses

Contract All Courses |

 

Fine Arts 3D: Sculpture

  
  •  

    3DSC451 Adv.Studio: Sculpture 3 cr.


    Production of a consistent, advanced body of work. Students work with faculty to develop a personal body of work that represents depth and breadth of exploration of appropriate media. Group and individual discussions emphasize the development of critical vocabulary along with advanced technical exploration. 6 credits

    Prerequisites: All freshman/sophomore level SC requirements (SC200/SC201)

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Departmental Requirement
    Spring

Fine Arts 3D: Three Dimensional Arts

  
  •  

    3DTD201 Projects in Wood 3 cr.


    An introduction to object-building in the woodshop. Students are instructed in the proper use and application of hand and power tools, material selection, and safety issues. Weekly projects incorporate design/concept problem solving with various construction form-making techniques.

    Prerequisites: SFDN182, SFDN183, SFDN191

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Culturally Diverse Content
    Fall/Spring
  
  •  

    3DTD208 Objects That Change Lives 3 cr.


    This is a studio-based course that focuses on making ceramic objects which improve people’s health and living conditions. Students will be introduced to various global non-profit organizations whose missions are to combine art and social concerns, including water purification, hunger, shelter and mental stress while learning how to make their own ceramic objects. Various handbuilding, wheelthrowing, mold-making and design techniques will be used in studio projects. This course is appropriate for both beginning and advanced-level students.

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Sustainabilty Content
  
  •  

    3DTD213 Artist Resource Projects 3 cr.


    MassArt is an institution, but it doesn’t have to look like one! There are many needs that the college has for stairway banisters, planters, railings, conference tables, signage etc. This course is a focused effort to address some of the needs of the college as a professional, creative opportunity. Students select one or more projects for the class to address as a group effort.

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Culturally Diverse Content
  
  •  

    3DTD214 Lasercutting for Object Makers 3cr.


    This is a multi-disciplinary course using laser-cutting technology to explore new ways of
    designing and making art with digital design processes to achieve a physical outcome. The
    course provides a hands-on introduction to laser technology as a resource for creative
    applications within the art practice. Students will investigate the use of multiple materials
    resulting in sculptural objects and installation concepts, jewelry and accessories, apparel and
    functional products.  This process is particularly interesting for the creation of
    multiples, for the fabrication of functional components, for the production of repeated simple
    shapes and for the creation of one of a kind objects. In addition instruction in laser cutting
    and software, students will be introduced to the use of hand tools, drills, cold connections, heat
    forming and adhesives.

    Undergraduate Elective
    Spring Only
  
  •  

    3DTD307 Trojan Horse Project 3cr


    This is a studio course open to beginning and advanced students. The course will focus on the interrelationship between technology and culture
    and is dedicated to the study of historically significant artifacts.[Formerly Technlogy and Culture]

    Fall and Spring
  
  •  

    3DTD309 History of Adornment 3 cr.


    This lecture-based course is designed to provide a deeper understanding of the jewelry traditions in non-western as well as western cultures. Topics are thematically organized and examine historic and contemporary contexts through slide lectures. The lectures are complemented by a library tour, fieldtrips, visits to local museum collections and current gallery exhibitions and visiting artist lectures (which are organized by the Jewelry and Metalsmithing Area). Ongoing class discussions focus on related topics and assigned reading material. Part of the class is geared towards strengthening presentation as well as research skills through specific assignments.

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    3DTD322 DIY Industrial Art Tech 3cr.


    This course is designed to allow students to develop and utilize “do it your self”
    applications of industrial technologies.  The goal is to empower students to examine and
    dissect process that require expensive and complex equipment that are prohibitively
    expensive or otherwise difficult to access or obtain in order to develop safe and effective
    “hacks” that can be achieved with a trip to the local hardware store.

    Prerequisites: 3DTD-201 or permission of instructor

    Undergraduate Elective
    Fall Only
  
  •  

    3DTD330 The Art of Furniture Design I: Fundamentals of Design and Construction 3 cr.


    In this course students initiate and are guided through a hands-on design/build project based on fundamental tenets of furniture design. Students will come to class with work from Design Processes for Furniture Design to use as the basis for their project. This studio shop course will begin with a review of design fundamentals and the concept design process. If necessary, concepts are refined through additional drawings and maquette model-making as preparation for the concluding phase: completion of the final product. This class will also be open to students outside of the certificate program who have experience in basic hand tool use and maintenance as well as a comfort level for work in standing machine power tools.

    Prerequisites: Design Processes for Furniture Design

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Departmental Elective
  
  •  

    3DTD340 The Art of Furniture Design II: Fundamentals of Design and Construction 3 cr.


    In this course students initiate and are guided through a hands-on design/build project based on fundamental tenets of furniture design. Students will come to class with work from Design Processes for Furniture Design to use as the basis for their project. This studio shop course will begin with a review of design fundamentals and the concept design process. If necessary, concepts are refined through additional drawings and maquette model-making as preparation for the concluding phase: completion of the final product. This class will also be open to students outside of the certificate program who have experience in basic hand tool use and maintenance as well as a comfort level for work in standing machine power tools.

    Prerequisites: The Art of Furniture Design: Fundamentals of Design and Construction I

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Departmental Elective
  
  •  

    3DTD392 TDA Course Assistantship


  
  •  

    3DTD398 TDA Internship


  
  •  

    3DTD399 TDA Independent Study


  
  •  

    3DTD400 FA3D Senior Seminar 3 cr.


    An examination of the business aspects of being an artist and a survey of career options and graduate school possibilities. Various professionals visit the class, including accountants, gallery directors, curators, lawyers, working artists, and public art directors. Students prepare a professional portfolio, which includes a resume and statement of intent, and give several presentations. Students are required to leave a copy of these materials in the FA3D office upon graduation. This course is required of all seniors in FA3D and is offered in the fall semester only.

    Lecture/Seminar
    Fall
  
  •  

    3DTD440 Intermediate Furniture Design: Pre-Capstone Studio 3 cr.


    Working with greater autonomy in the shop environment, each student develops a more advanced design project in consultation with faculty. The project will be based on students’ ongoing practice of concept documentation and idea development in their sketchbooks, and focused on continued evolution of individual vision and practice. Practical issues such as rapid decision making and timely procurement of materials are incorporated into the design/build process. This course may be combined with the Art of Furniture class depending upon enrollment.

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Departmental Elective
  
  •  

    3DTD441 Furniture Design Capstone 3 cr.


    This is the culmination of a five-semester concentration on the development of studio furniture. Students are required to produce a significant work of merit - a furniture suite, or a series of pieces - in order to successfully complete the capstone course. The expectation is for the student to produce work which is a cohesive representation of his or her individual aesthetic voice and vision. As such, the final work will be the defining element of the emerging artist’s portfolio as the student moves into professional practice.

    Prerequisites: Intermediate Furniture Design: Pre-Capstone studio

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Departmental Elective

Graphic Design

  
  •  

    CDGD206 Sophomore Graphic Design Studio 6 cr.


    This sophomore-level required course meets twice per week for 5 hours; it is a 6-credit course. Sophomore Studio provides a foundation in the methods of concept, image, and form development. Students are introduced to the language of design; working in both traditional and digital media, students will explore issues of form, color, texture, image, sequence and narrative, learning how to harness these elements to communicate concepts clearly, effectively and expressively. Mind-mapping and the sketching of ideas as a part of the process of inquiry and design problem solving also will be covered. Faculty will collaborate and share lectures and demonstrations across all sections.

    Prerequisites: SFDN185

    Double Hybrid Studio
    Culturally Diverse Content
    Departmental Requirement
    Fall
  
  •  

    CDGD210 Typography I 3 cr.


    A study of the design and use of basic letterforms, typographic contrast, hierarchy of information, major type families and their characteristics, typographic grids, and legibility.

    Prerequisites: SFDN185

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Departmental Requirement
    Fall
  
  •  

    CDGD214 Lettering in Design 3 cr


    This course will cover the fundamentals of brush
    lettering and design from a sign painting
    perspective.
     
    In the first section, we’ll study and execute
    four key alphabets that are central to hand
    lettering and commercial design. The alphabets
    will first be formed by pencil and chalk, then
    crafted by brush as the lesson advances.
     
    The second section will cover lettering layout.
    Here we will examine principles of natural
    layout, format, negative space, line value,
    rhythm, and color. These principles will then be
    utilized in the creation of painted show
    cards-advertising signs that are intentionally
    temporary and often painted on paper.
     
    The third section will explore the use of “bells
    and whistles” in letterform and design. Here we
    will learn how to alter the traditional
    letterform to create a more expressive cousin.
    We’ll also look at other forms of ornamentation
    including dimension, convex, pinstripes, and
    flourishes.
     
    The final project will entail creating a
    hand-painted design for a mock client. You will
    be responsible for interpreting the client’s
    requests and creating a design that utilizes the
    skills you’ve learned throughout the semester.

    Prerequisites: CDGD210

    Critique
    Departmental Elective
    Fall/Spring
  
  •  

    CDGD220 Graphic Design I 3 cr.


    Basic design principles and skills are applied to graphic design projects. The course presents the formal elements of typography, color, and idea generation in the context of design responsibility and the development of professional attitudes and approaches to problem solving.

    Prerequisites: CDGD210

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Departmental Requirement
    Spring
  
  •  

    CDGD230 Typography II 6 cr.


    In this sophomore level required course, students continue their typographic education by looking at issues of text type, typographic structure and hierarchy. They develop their sensitivity to type at both a macro and micro level, and explore issues related to typography for print and screen environments. The course meets twice a week.

    Prerequisites: CDGD210 Typography I

    Double Hybrid Studio
    Departmental Requirement
    Spring
  
  •  

    CDGD300 Letterpress Printing 3 cr.


    An introduction to hand set metal and wooden type, letterpress printing techniques, and limited edition printing on fine papers. Emphasis on typography rather than pictorial elements.

    Prerequisites: CDGD210 or by permission of the instructor with equivalent class, or printmaking courses

    Critique
    Departmental Elective
  
  •  

    CDGD304 Web Design I 3 cr.


    Introduction to web development skills through the use of Dreamweaver and Flash. Design for the web and multimedia through the use of assignments, examples, and discussion.

    Prerequisites: CDGD220

    Critique
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    CDGD305 Community Partnership Design 3 cr.


    This course explores almost every area involved in print production for graphic designers,
    including offset printing, printing estimates and working with a printer, binding and finishing
    paper, pre- press, color seperation and color proofing, and halftones and scanning issues. The
    course centers around a community service- based print project that is designed and produced by
    students.[Formely Print Production]

    Prerequisites: CDGD220, CDGD230

    Critique
    Culturally Diverse Content
    Departmental Elective
  
  •  

    CDGD306 Digital Photography 3 cr.


    This course will focus on encouraging students to develop a personal vision and means of photographic expression coupled with the technical skills and confidence to work in digital media to improve the content of their individual communication through print or the web. By introducing students to the language and tools of digital photography, they will understand how to create, import and transform images into digital format as well as alter them using a graphics program. Students will also explore some of the fundamental principles of photography and its uses.

    Prerequisites: CDGD 210 or CDIL 205

    Critique
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    CDGD322 Information Architecture II 3 cr.


    Advanced course in information architecture focused on exploring large and complex, user-centered systems of information with emphasis on organization, navigation and management. Subjects of study include printed and interactive media. The course content represents professional problem-solving methods in interface design.

    Prerequisites: CDGD342 Information Architecture I

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Departmental Requirement
    Spring
  
  •  

    CDGD340 Graphic Design II: Making Meaning 3 cr.


    In this junior level required course, students explore how meaning is created through design by looking at visual communication strategies, communication theory, and the roles of message senders and receivers in the communication process. Coursework includes both print and simple time-based applied projects.

    Prerequisites: CDGD220 Graphic Design I

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Departmental Requirement
    Fall
  
  •  

    CDGD341 Typography III: Designer and Content 3 cr.


    In this junior level required course, students continue their study of typography, focusing on issues of authorship and editing, and the designer’s relationship to text content. Projects are more experimental in nature, and move beyond the single project to simple systems. Additionally, the course involves a research component which prepares students for their degree project research the following semester.

    Prerequisites: CDGD230

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Departmental Requirement
    Spring
  
  •  

    CDGD342 Information Architecture I 3 cr.


    This is an introductory course covering basic concepts, methods, and procedures of information architecture with a focus on managing information complexity. This course addresses issues of information structures developed for various contexts and audiences. Subjects of study include print and interactive media, and both static and dynamic approaches to information design.

    Prerequisites: CDGD210 & CDGD220

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Departmental Requirement
    Fall
  
  •  

    CDGD343 Poster Design 3 cr.


    This junior/senior course continues to develop skills in creativity and graphic design focusing on the poster’s utilitarian goal. The course emphasizes conceptual, visual and technical aspects of the medium, its history and impact on society emphasizing persuasive communication and education.

    Prerequisites: CDGD220

    Critique
    Culturally Diverse Content
    Departmental Elective
  
  •  

    CDGD347 Advanced Web Projects 3 cr


    Students will apply their knowledge of web design
    to create advanced applications that deal with
    the manipulation and display of data. The course
    will cover a range of technologies essential to
    modern web design and development including
    HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, jQuery, PHP and MySQL.

    Prerequisites: CDGD304

    Critique
    Departmental Elective
    Spring
  
  •  

    CDGD353 Type Design 3 cr.


    This introductory elective course for junior and senior graphic design majors explores the drawing and spacing of collections of digital letterforms. Students will develop original typeface designs with the goal of enhancing their sensitivity to the shapes and uses of letters within print and electronic media. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing better insight into the history and classification of typefaces through the exploration of the influence that traditional and digital design tools have had as shapers of form. Projects will include designing typefaces in response to particular design challenges, the creation of expressive and decorative letterforms, and the consideration of the possibilities within on-screen dynamic typography.

    Prerequisites: CDGD210 Typography I

    Critique
    Departmental Elective
  
  •  

    CDGD357 Identity Systems 3 Cr


    Branding is an integral part of professionalpractice. It goes far beyond logo design to
    engage all elements of a designer’s skill set,from critical anaylsis and strategic thinking, to
    exacting typography and color theory. Branding establishes systems that allow an organization to
    visually express its values and aspirations, and creates a clear and consistent voice across
    materials, including business papers, websites,brochures and interfaces.

    In this class we will explore the branding process from the ground up. We will create
    research-based identity systems that include refined logos, color palettes, typography suites,
    and image guidelines, all of which will be fleshed out in print and digital samples. We will
    discuss branding’s historical precedents, and how those models are evolving in an increasingly
    digital environment.

    Prerequisites: CDGD-220  and CDGD-230

    Hybrid Studio Critique
    Elective
    Fall/Spring

  
  •  

    CDGD362 Communication Design in the Global Village: Tokyo and Seoul 3cr


    Communication Design is an umbrella term
    describing multiple design disciplines at the
    service of information. Examples of Communication
    Design include graphic design, information
    architecture, typography, illustration,
    animation, interaction design, user experience
    design, environmental design, service design,
    service design, design strategy and many others.
    The role of communication design is constantly
    changing. It is no longer what once was described
    as a problem-solving industrial art. We are
    currently witnessing the designer’s urge to
    establish his or her own voice which includes the
    creation of autonomous work or creating and
    editing content, therefore the difference between
    the self-initiated and real commissioned projects
    becomes increasingly blurred. Communication
    Design in Japan and Korea both historically and
    currently proves to be at the cutting edge of
    defining new concepts and new challenges within
    social communications, communication design, and
    communication technology. An opportunity to
    explore these multiple facets of design and art
    in Japan and Korea, and to study - at its source
    - a unique Asian contribution to the global
    culture, will certainly create an inspiring,
    intellectually stimulating and memorable learning
    experience for MassArt, COF and ProArts students.

    Travel Course
    Undergraduate Elective
    Spring
  
  •  

    CDGD364 Language of Motion 3 cr.


    In Language of Motion students explore visual narratives in reference to
    time-based media. The course emphasizes conceptual, visual and technical aspects of
    typography in motion. [Formerly DynamicTypography]

    Prerequisites: CDGD210

    Critique
    Departmental Elective
  
  •  

    CDGD392 GD Course Assistantship


    A course assistantship allows qualified
    sophomores, juniors, and seniors to assist a
    faculty member with whom they have studied
    previously. Duties may include set up, assisting
    with demonstrations and critiques during class
    meetings. Course assistants may not grade
    students. Students may register for only one
    3-credit course assistantship each semester, and
    no more than two such assistantships may count
    toward degree requirements.
    Students selected by faculty to be course
    assistants submit a Course Assistantship form
    with the faculty and chair’s signatures to the
    Registrar during registration and no later than
    the end of the Add/Drop period. Students who are
    performing a Teaching Assistantship should follow
    Independent Study procedures

    Prerequisites: By Permission of Instructor

  
  •  

    CDGD398 GD Internship


    An internship is a supervised professional
    experience that allows you to use classroom
    training in a real work environment, develop your
    skills, focus your career goals, and make
    professional contacts.
    MassArt offers students enrolled in a degree
    program the opportunity to register an internship
    for credit. An internship counts as 3 studio
    elective credits. To receive credit, the
    internship must meet our basic internship
    requirements, be approved by a faculty advisor,
    and registered before you start the internship.

  
  •  

    CDGD399 GD Independent Study


    Juniors and seniors who have a specific studio
    project which cannot be accomplished within the
    structure of a course may arrange to work with a
    faculty member on an independent basis. The
    Independent Study form (available in the
    Registrar’s Office) includes a description of the
    project. Students may take only one 3-credit
    independent study each semester, and no more than
    four independent studies will count toward the
    degree.
    Independent Study forms, with faculty and the
    chair’s signatures, should be submitted to the
    Registrar during registration and not later than
    the Add/Drop deadline.

    Prerequisites: By Permission of Instructor

  
  •  

    CDGD402 Design Research 3 cr.


    In this studio/seminar course, students will explore multiple goals and methods of design research in the context of communication design practice. Through case studies and studio projects, multiple creative strategies and tactics in design research will be investigated. The course will make a strong argument for performing rigorous experimentation and analysis as creative practice that makes designers’ way of thinking and communicating so unique. Additionally, the course involves a student-defined research project in preparation for degree project course.

    Prerequisites: CDGD340, CDGD341

    Lecture/Seminar
    Departmental Requirement
    Fall
  
  •  

    CDGD403 Professional Practice 3cr


    Professional Practice is a deep dive into the
    business of graphic design: how it works, how
    it’s structured, and how best to prepare yourself
    for a successful career. We’ll look at the
    different career opportunities available to you
    in design studios and what you can expect when
    you’re hired. We’ll explore everything it takes
    to be a freelancer from writing proposals and
    setting prices to managing clients and delivering
    work. We’ll investigate what it takes to start
    your own studio, how to finance it, how to market
    and sell your services, and how to win repeat
    business. And we’ll see how entrepreneurial
    designers are launching innovative new businesses
    and services.

    Prerequisites: CDGD-411

    Lecture
    Spring
  
  •  

    CDGD411 Graphic Design IV 3 cr.


    Students work on complex projects, researching and developing content. Finished work is portfolio quality, and conceptual thinking, problem-solving, and formal design principles are explored in each critique. Projects allow opportunity for discussion concerning professional business practice and design ethics.

    Prerequisites: CDGD340 & CDGD341

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Departmental Requirement
    Fall
  
  •  

    CDGD414 Advertising Design 3 cr.


    This course is an introduction to advertising and explores the kinds of problems that advertising agencies deal with on a day-to-day basis. The interrelationship of the art director, the client, and the consumer is emphasized with the focus on solutions to typical agency problems. When possible, informal talks with art directors and visits to Boston agencies are arranged.

    Prerequisites: CDGD220 or CDIL220

    Critique
    Departmental Elective
  
  •  

    CDGD415 Advertising Design II 3 cr.


    This is an advanced course in advertising that builds on the skills and issues introduced in GD 414.

    Prerequisites: CDGD414

    Critique
    Departmental Elective
  
  •  

    CDGD420 Graphic Design Portfolio 3 cr.


    Preparation of an entry-level portfolio demonstrating professional competence in design, concept, and craft with an emphasis on the student’s particular area of interest. Students pass a review panel, produce a resume, and interview in the professional design community.

    Prerequisites: CDGD410 & CDGD402

    Critique
    Departmental Requirement
    Spring
  
  •  

    CDGD430 Senior Degree Project 3 cr.


    A continuation of the research began in GD 303X, in this course students synthesize the research, document the design process, and produce a final project based on the chosen subject of their research. At the end of the course, process documentation and design projects are exhibited at a departmental showing.

    Prerequisites: CDGD402, CDGD411

    Critique
    Departmental Requirement
    Spring

History of Art

  
  •  

    HART100 Introduction to Western Art 3 cr.


    This course is a condensed and comprehensive introduction to the history of Western art from prehistorical times to the twenty-first century. The basic purpose of the course is three-fold: to examine a selection of the most significant monuments of creative endeavor which constitute the canon of Western art; to contextualize succinctly, with historical references and coetaneous examples in other media (especially literature), those monuments; and, finally, to engage students in the ongoing discourse which determines and revises the canon and the ways in which we see and interpret works of art.

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Required
    Fall
  
  •  

    HART206 Art & Revolution 3 cr.


    Exploration of the cultural and artistic responses to the major modern, social and,
    political revolutions between the end of the 18thand 20th centuries. The focus is on rarely
     covered artistic responses to political, social,and religious revolutions of the 20th century.
     Historical, political, philosophical currents and their impact on painting, sculpture, and
    architecture are analyzed. Using a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approach, the visual arts
    are viewed in the context of their relationships to political, social, and religious events of
    their representative time periods.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART207 Ancient Greek Art 3 cr.


    Glory of Ancient Greece: Gods, Politics, and Art will survey the private and public art and architecture produced in Greece and its colonies in the east and west. Emphasis will be placed on the interrelationships among art, mythology, religion, athletics, and history. The class will first discuss the early periods before the people known as Greeks and continue with the formation of the Greek city-state and the rise of Athens as a cultural center of the Greek world in the mid-fifth century B.C.E. Students will then address the spread of Hellenism under Alexander the Great, and conclude with the Late Hellenistic Period shortly after Roman domination of the Mediterranean world.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
  
  •  

    HART208 Ancient Roman Art: Politics, Propaganda, and the Decadence of Rome 3 cr.


    By the beginning of the third century CE, Rome’s dominance reached to England in the north, Africa in the south, and Russia and Iraq in the east. By the late third century CE, however, the Roman Empire became unstable. How was one city able to amass such a vast territory in a relatively short period of time? What were the long-lasting effects of Rome’s attempt at world domination? To help answer these questions and others, students will explore the numerous advancements made in architecture, engineering, and art during the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. Students will also become familiar with various forms of entertainment and literature that address the social, political, and religious makeup of the Roman world.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
  
  •  

    HART209 Early Christian and Byzantine Art 3 cr.


    This course will examine the visual arts of early Christianity from its roots until the fall of the Roman Empire in the Latin west in the fifth century, and will continue with an examination of the visual arts of the Roman Empire in the Greek east until the fall of Constantinople in 1453. Topics to be considered will range from whether the image of Christ might be rooted in that of Zeus or of the Roman Emperor to the role and function of icons; from iconoclasm to the art of monumental mosaics; and from cross-cultural interactions between Christian, Jewish and Islamic visual cultures to the role of visual culture in marking the development of a variety of Christian identities.

    Prerequisites: Freshman Seminar

    Lecture/Seminar
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART210 Early Medieval Art 3 cr.


    A survey of art produced in early Medieval Europe, Western Asia, and North Africa, focusing on the interaction among the diverse cultural traditions of classical Rome, Byzantium, and Northern Europe from the decline of the Roman Empire through the Christianization of Europe, the advent of Islam, and the establishment of the Holy Roman Empire under Charlemagne. Emphasis will be on wall painting, manuscript illumination, stone sculpture, and portable metalwork objects.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART212 Medieval Castles and Cathedrals 3 cr.


    A survey of major monuments of European architecture from the Early Christian era through the Gothic style, including both religious and secular buildings. Elements of structure, and design sources and processes, will be considered alongside the function and reception of different buildings and building types. The class will also explore the place of architecture in urban and rural settings, the importance of pilgrimage and Crusading for the transmission of ideas, and the translation of monastic ideals into buildings.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART222 Artistic Personality in the Renaissance I: The Early Renaissance 3 cr.


    Students undertake an investigation of Italian
    art in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.
    Students will concentrate onthose artists whose
    works signal the transition from the Early to the
    High Renaissance, a brief period when Western
    culture finds a spectacular climax in the
    artistic productions of Florence, Rome and
    Venice, and when such work comes to be known,
    imported, emulated and revered throughout Western
    Europe and beyond. Primary sources, and above all
    the artistic biographies of Giorgio Vasari, will
    be complemented by modern and contemporary
    scholastic commentaries. Artists include Giotto,
    Duccio, Masaccio, Brunelleschi,
    Alberti, Donatello.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART223 Artistic Personality in the Renaissance II: High Renaissance 3 cr.


    Students undertake a detailed examination of the High Renaissance, the supreme moment of artistic achievement in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. Primary sources, and above all the artistic biographies of Giorgio Vasari, will be complemented by modern and contemporary scholastic commentaries. Artists include Botticelli, Leonardo, Michelangelo,
    Bramante, Raphael, the Bellini, Giorgione, Titian.


    (Please note: It is NOT necessary for students to
    have taken HART 222 in order to take this course.)

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective

  
  •  

    HART226 Northern Renaissance Art 3 cr.


    This course explores the art of the Netherlands, France, England, Bohemia, and Germany between about 1350 and 1560, focusing on the development of panel painting and portraiture, and on changes in subject matter, patronage, and the artist’s practice related to the Protestant Reformation. Modern debates about interpretation and the revelations of recent technical analyses will be brought to bear on the works of Claus Sluter, Jan Van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, Petrus Christus, Hieronymous Bosch, Pieter Brughel, Albrecht Durer, Hans Holbein, and others.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART231 American Art and Visual Culture, 1600 to the present 3 cr.


    A survey of American painting, architecture, sculpture, prints and photography from 1600 to the present, covering a wide range of movements including Early American Art, Native American Art, Civil War era photography, Gilded Age painting and architecture, the Ashcan School, Early American Modernism, Regionalism, Surrealism, and Abstract Expressionism. The course will include visits to local museums and institutions that house some of the finest collections of American art in the country, including the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Fogg Museum. We will examine style, technique, and iconography in their historical and cultural contexts, considering the political, social, and intellectual climates articulated in the arts, including systems of patronage and public reception.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART240 Art and Archeology of Ancient Mesoamerica 3 cr.


    Students explore the arts and cultures of the Aztec, Maya and other ancient civilizations of Mexico and Guatemala from 3000 B.C. to the Spanish Conquest of 1521. Special emphasis is given to the formation of religious ideologies and to the processes of urbanization and state development and decline. The legacy of ancient Mesoamerica in modern and contemporary art and culture in the Americas also will be addressed.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART252 Survey of Japanese Art 3 cr.


    Japanese culture has been taking and transforming diverse cultural elements from various traditions into its own. The unique art of Japan continues to inspire modern artists. This class is designed as a basic introduction to Japanese art from antiquity to the modern era. It is a chronologically organized survey of the canon of Japanese art, including ceramics, architecture, sculpture, painting, woodblock prints, and religious art. We will analyze the works of art and place the art in historical and social context. We examine how this unique tradition develops and changes through the ages and how this tradition interacts with other traditions of art.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART270 Modernism in European Visual Culture, 1886-1936 3 cr.


    This surveys major movements and theories of modernism in the European visual arts from the end of the nineteenth century to the 1930s.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART273 American Architecture: From Thomas Jefferson to Frank Gehry 3 cr.


    This course will trace the evolution of American architecture from the country’s earliest days to recent years. It will explore how national identity, landscape, and history have factored into the creation of a uniquely American architectural dialogue. The course will engage primary source texts and local sites to illustrate the nuances of important themes.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART274 Early American Art 3 cr.


    This course will focus on art and architecture in colonial and early America beginning with Native American Art up to the early nineteenth century, including artists such as John Singleton Copley, Joshua Johnston, Charles Willson Peale, Rembrandt Peale, Paul Revere, Gilbert Stuart John Trumbull, John Vanderlyn. The course will examine American art, architecture, decorative arts and visual culture from the period c. 1600 to c. 1825 from a variety of perspectives. This course will have at its center the question of how we read/should read works of art, and thus the varied course readings will range from traditional to more recent and even controversial methodological frameworks.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
  
  •  

    HART280 Art Since 1945 3 cr.


    In this course we analyze several individual
    practices and group movements from 1945 to the
    present. Instead of adhering to the distilled
    summaries of a textbook, we engage art of this
    period at less of a remove. Students come to
    comprehend the difficulty and subjectivity
    involved in formulating a history of art by
    struggling to grasp one viewpoint, and then by
    considering similarities, differences, and
    distinctions of degree between it and other
    viewpoints. Through this firsthand experience,
    students weave together an understanding of art
    history that acknowledges the true variety and
    complexity of art at any given moment in the
    second half of the twentieth century and the
    first decades of the twenty-first.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART281 Art After Modernism 3cr


    “Modernism” comprises images, objects, acts,
    performances, and so on that derive from an
    artist’s experimentation with the inherent
    properties of a given medium. Art after modernism
    (sometimes called “postmodern”) tends to expand
    upon the technical, material, and
    intellectual foundations of modernism while also
    investigating identity and personal narrative;
    political ambiguity and complicity;
    institutional critique; the imagery of commerce;
    and mechanisms of the artworld and other
    phenomena from culture at large. This development
    amounts to both an extension and a rejection of
    modernist principles, and we will aim to
    understand this complexity in recent art.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Spring
  
  •  

    HART283 Russian Modernism 3 cr.


    A survey of modern art and architecture in Russia from the beginning of the twentieth century. The course will explore issues of national identity and cultural autonomy that informed the emergence of modernism; the postcolonial relationship to European art; the tension between nationalism and internationalism, and how the experiences of exile and diaspora affect these feelings and the artistic expressions thereof; how artists respond to forces such as imperialism, authoritarianism, and revolution; and how globalizing and transnational social, economic and political processes call into question the notion of Russian art. (Formerly “Twentieth Century Russian Art”)

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture
    Culturally Diverse Content
    Fall and Spring
  
  •  

    HART284 Moving Pictures: Visual Language of Narrative Cinema: Techniques and Traditions 3 cr.


    Concentrating on the visual language of film, this course will consider the pictorial traditions upon which the new medium draws, and out of which, to some extent, it can be said to grow. We will compare the composition of the standard modules of cinema, the shot and the scene, with precedents drawn from Western art history, from Greek vase paintings to Renaissance fresco cycles and nineteenth-century English narrative pictures. We will simultaneously consider what is unique to the new medium. Weekly examinations of film clips in order to illustrate traditional and non-traditional visual techniques of cinematic narrative will be complemented by wide-ranging readings and regular viewing and reviewing of full-length films. Following a brief history of the medium before the Second World War, we will identify and examine many of the traditional ways in which cinematic artists compose their visual narratives. We will then undertake an in-depth study of some of the major works of cinema since 1945, including films by Rossellini, Bresson, Hitchcock, the French New Wave directors and those of Das Neue Kino in Germany, and the American Independents.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART285 History of Photography 3 cr.


    An introduction to the history of photography from the inventions of Daguerre and Fox Talbot to the twentieth century masters. The course addresses problems and issues arising from the different techniques of, and the interrelationships between, art, photography, science, and society.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART286 Modern Architecture 3 cr.


    An investigation of the designed and built environment, from the end of the nineteenth century to the present day. This course examines the influence of technology, aesthetics, politics, social history and economics on modern architecture and urban planning, including the Chicago School, Art Nouveau, international modernism of the 1920s to the 1960s, Post-Modernism, Deconstructivism and worldwide contemporary theory and practice.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART287 Survey of Video Art, 1968-Present 3 cr.


    In this course we trace the new answers and new questions formulated by selected video artists over the last forty years. Throughout the semester, we study these two trajectories thematically. Artists’ investigations of video-imaging tools, signal processing, recorders, magnetic tape, and cathode-ray tube screens may continue in surprising ways the modernist tradition of a medium’s self-reflexivity (and so offer new answers to existing questions). Alternatively, experimentation with audience behavior, criticism of broadcast television, and women’s use of video as a medium untainted by patriarchy amount to fresh areas of exploration (so, new questions). Students watch two hours of video each week in preparation for classroom discussion. In addition to viewing the works themselves, students analyze several kinds of written accounts-by artists, by art critics, and by art historians-surrounding video art practices from 1968 to the present.

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART295 Design History 3 cr.


    This course will provide an overview of one hundred and sixty years of American and European decorative arts and design theory, beginning with the English Aesthetic Reform movement, covering Le Corbusier’s modernist coat of whitewash and the international style, and ending with contemporary designers and thinkers. The class will analyze furniture, ceramics, silver, architecture, clothing, and textiles using the design theories of such seminal figures as John Ruskin, William Morris, Owen Jones, Henri Van de Velde, Walter Gropius, Adolf Loos, and Le Corbusier. The time frame will encompass the nineteenth century historicist revivals, the Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, “purist” functionality, and the “modern.” Other themes that will be addressed are the art/craft divide, the origins of the unified interior, the dissemination of design theory to the broader public via the world’s fairs and the department store, and the attempt to develop “national” styles.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART297 Roots of Design History, 1650-1920 3 cr.


    This course examines the history of designed objects, largely furnishings, inclusive of industrial design and graphic design, handicraft and automation. The Industrial Revolution changed the domestic sphere as much as the conditions of labor. The increase in mass-produced and accessible goods (and in ownership) is often referred to in shorthand as ‘democratization’ and as a characteristic component of the American experience. IKEA and Philippe Starck employ the phrase ‘democratic design’ and DIY practitioners use it to stake out their independence from corporations. Can we also use this perspective to evaluate the proliferation of such things as newspapers, clocks, mantelpiece statuary, chairs, ice cream bowls and sardine forks between 1650 and 1920? (Formerly American Design, 1650- 1920)

     

    Prerequisites: HART100

    All College Elective
    Spring
  
  •  

    HART300 Art of Ancient Iraq 3 cr


    The arts of the ancient Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian cultures of Mesopotamia (Iraq) from the
    eighth millennium BC through the fall of the Babylonian Empire in 539 BC. Emphasis is on the
    interpretation of art objects as evidence for such historical, social, and cultural developments as
    urbanism, social stratification, the institutionalization of religion, imperialism, and
    international commerce.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Sustainabilty Content
    Fall Only
  
  •  

    HART301 Art of Ancient Egypt 3 cr.


    Survey of the visual culture of ancient Egypt from the Predynastic period (ca. 5000 B.C.) until the end of the New Kingdom (ca. 1000 B.C.). Emphasis is on major examples of architecture, sculpture, and painting viewed in their historical, political, social, economic, and religious contexts. The class looks at the methods and goals of archaeological work in Egypt and how these have shaped contemporary views of the ancient culture.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse and Sustainabilty Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART305 The Body Politic in American Art to 1876 3cr


    This course examines how representations in art
    and visual culture were tools with which
    individuals learned to think of themselves as
    American, from the Colonial era to the late 19th
    century.Considering how class, race, gender, and
    models of physical health and fitness were
    rendered visible to widely-dispersed viewers, we
    attend to the ‘body’ in the body politic. We
    examine how the self, both externalized and
    internalized,  was understood as essential to
    American identity, and mapped onto emerging
    concepts of a democratic society. Throughout the
    class, we will question what it means to be
    ‘American,’ and consider the ways in which issues
    important in the development of 19thcentury art
    remain significant to artists today.

    Prerequisites: HART-100

    Lecture
    Spring
  
  •  

    HART307 The Banjo As American Material Culture 3cr


    Might an understanding of this musical instrument
    expose the American psyche more fully than a
    gallery of paintings or book of laws? The
    Americanized African instrument remains a potent
    icon today and we will explore its varieties of
    mythic and material reincarnations,
    contextualizing it in historical studies of
    labor, race, class, gender, technology and
    musicology.

    Taken with Sculpture 3DS “The Banjo Project”
    -they are co-requisites

    Prerequisites: HART-100 Co-requisites: 3DTD-The Banjo Project

    Seminar
    Fall

  
  •  

    HART311 Materials and Methods in Medieval Art 3 cr.


    This course will examine the broad range of materials used to create works of art during the Middle Ages, the techniques used and the thinking that underpinned medieval ideas about artists, art works and the process of artistic creation. Attention will be given to a variety of artistic media produced during the Middle Ages from monumental architecture, stone sculpture and wall painting, to manuscript illumination, textiles and metal work.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
  
  •  

    HART320 Villas and Gardens of the Italian Renaissance 3 cr.


    An investigation of the architecture of leisure in Renaissance Italy, from the early Humanist villas of the powerful Medici family to the farm-villa complexes designed by Palladio in the sixteenth century. Gardens and villas are considered in their role as purveyors of the economic, social and political power of the elite, and in relation to ancient literary and archeological sources and Renaissance design theory.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART325 Palaces,Pavilions and Gardens 3cr.


    Much of Islamic art is inspired by ideas of paradise. This course will explore the image of paradise and its models in Islamic arts from the 8th through 18th centuries. Islamic palace and garden complexes such as the Alhambra, the Taj Mahal, Topkapi, and others will be examined, as well as paradisical themes in Islamic portable arts, color theory, and abstract geometries. The historical origins of Muslim paradise iconography will be investigated, including the role of Qur’anic and other early Islamic texts, and the ancient garden traditions of Persia, Rome, and Byzantium.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Culturally Diverse
    Undergraduate Elective
    Spring
  
  •  

    HART340 Maya Art and Archaeology 3 cr.


    An intensive study of the ancient Maya of Mexico and Guatemala, creators of magnificent sculpture, architecture, painting and ceramics. Students will examine the origins of the Maya, their calendars, writing and artistic traditions, trace the history of the major Maya cities and investigate the decline of Classic Maya art and civilization. The course concludes with the study of modern Maya culture and political issues.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART346 Australian Art 3 cr.


    This course will examine aspects of visual art and architecture produced on the Australian continent before, during and after the colonial era. In addition to questions of style, meaning and technique, attention will be placed on the question of identity: what do terms such as Australian, Aboriginal, western, non-western mean in the context of contemporary Australia, its history and artistic culture.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
  
  •  

    HART347 Renaissance Splendor: Art & Architecture of Venice and the Veneto 3 cr


    An on-site, comprehensive examination of the painting, sculpture and architecture produced during the Golden Age of Venice, the Veneto and southern Lombardy, 1200-1800. There will be a classroom component at MassArt, in which students will discuss relevant art historical texts and learn conversational Italian. Beginning with a week-long stay in the great city itself, we will study the evolution of Venetian culture from its origins as an outpost of the Byzantine Empire to its rise as the greatest and most enduring republic the world has ever known, as well as one of the richest and most magnetic artistic centers in Europe. After seven days in Venice, we will leave for Mantua, stopping first in the foothills of the Alps to view Palladio’s Villa Barbaro, and then at Padua to view the frescoes by Giotto in the Arena Chapel, which for many mark the beginning of the Renaissance. In Mantua we will study the architecture of Alberti, the frescoes by Mantegna in the Ducal Palace, and finally, the tour-de-force of Renaissance pleasure construction, Giulio Romano’s Palazzo Te. SEE TRAVEL COURSE SECTION FOR OFFICIAL REGISTRATION PROCEDURES. TRAVEL TO ITALY REQUIRED.

    Prerequisites: HART100

  
  •  

    HART355 Survey of Chinese Art 3 cr.


    The long tradition of Chinese art is an important part of human aesthetic experience and a part of the cultural heritage of every modern woman and man in the global family. This class is a chronologically organized survey of the canon of Chinese art, including ceramic, jade, bronze, sculpture, architecture, garden, furniture, calligraphy, painting, and religious art. This survey is meant to provide a historical perspective on the works of art in their historical and social context over the centuries in China and to introduce the students to a repertoire of usable methods of approach to art. The concept of “China” itself is culturally constructed. Students in this class will be asked to think and examine critically how the works of art under the label “Chinese”. constitute a special tradition and how this tradition develops, changes, and interacts with other traditions of art through the ages.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART373 Architecture of Boston 3 cr.


    This course will explore the evolution of Boston’s architectural landscape from colonial times to the mid-twentieth century. Challenging the common adage that “Boston’s streets were laid out by cows,” the course will identify the local geographical, industrial, and social factors that uniquely shaped Boston’s development, and will situate the city’s growth within the context of larger national trends. Topics will include individual neighborhoods, as well as celebrated architects like Charles Bulfinch, H.H. Richardson, and Ralph Adams Cram. Primary-source texts and local site visits will supplement in-class mastery of material.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
  
  •  

    HART375 Landscape: Space and Place in Art 1600-2000 3 cr.


    Focusing on how artists have engaged with their environment from the eighteenth century through the twentieth, this class will subject the subject matter of landscape to close scrutiny. This class will look at parallel developments in Europe and America, and will consider how various stylistic movements in eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth century painting, as well as photography, graphic arts and even sculpture have reacted to the significance of space and place, and humankind’s impact on the land. Through regular reading assignments, student presentations and research projects, students will track their own relationship to the land, the city and the environment in which we live.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse and Sustainabilty Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART376 American Landscape 3 cr


    In 19th and 20th century America, concepts of ‘nature’ and ‘culture’ were intimately bound
    together, an integral part of how national, social, and cultural identities were forged.
    Landscape was governed by a host of parallel discourses: images of American spaces evoked
    commercial, political, religious, personal, social and scientific meanings. This course
    tracks the origins and development of fundamental relationships between people, space, resources,
    and the organic world.  We seek evidence of how poets, writers, and philosophers have also
    approached American space, and look at how artists have demonstrated concerns with
    sustainability and ecology in the Anthropocene.

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Sustainabilty Content
    Fall Only
  
  •  

    HART376 American Landscape 3cr.


    In 19th and 20th century America, concepts of ‘nature’ and ‘culture’ were intimately bound
    together, an integral part of how national, social, and cultural identities were forged.
    Landscape was governed by a host of parallel discourses: images of American spaces evoked
    commercial, political, religious, personal, social and scientific meanings. This course
    tracks the origins and development of fundamental relationships between people, space, resources,
    and the organic world.  We seek evidence of how poets, writers, and philosophers have also
    approached American space, and look at how artists have demonstrated concerns with
    sustainability and ecology in the Anthropocene.

    Prerequisites: HART-100

    Sustainabilty Content
    Fall Only
  
  •  

    HART381 History of Experimental Film 3 cr.


    In this course we trace the physical, physiological, and psychological investigations
    of experimental filmmakers over the last seventy years. Studying these three trajectories-matter,
    body, and mind-reveals “film” to be a complex interplay between what Paul Sharits described in
    1969 as “celluloid, two-dimensional strips; individual rectangular frames; the nature of
    sprockets and emulsion; projector operations; the three-dimensional light beam; environmental
    illumination; the two-dimensional reflective screen surface; the retinal screen; optic nerve
    and individual psycho-physical subjectivities and consciousness.” Students watch at least two hours
    of experimental film each week in preparation for classroom discussion. In addition to viewing the
    films themselves, students analyze several kinds of written accounts-by artists, by critics, and
    by historians-surrounding experimental film practices from 1945 to the present

    Prerequisites: HART100

    Spring Only
  
  •  

    HART390 Feminism and Art History 3cr


    The feminist movement of the 1960s and ‘70s
    raised questions for both artists and art
    historians about the absence of women in the
    canon of art history. Scholars and artists first
    set out to retrieve the stories of unsung
    heroines of the past, and to probe the nature of
    female creativity and artistic identity. These
    early efforts led to a deeper understanding of
    the effect of socially accepted gender roles on
    art production as well as reception. The
    development of feminist critical theory has
    changed the way we look at art history, not only
    from the perspective of gender identity, but also
    with an awareness of the ways that art reflects
    attitudes toward race, religion, and social
    status. This course will follow the trajectory of
    feminist art history and criticism as it has
    expanded from the first inquiries of the 1970s
    and enriched the stories we tell about art in the
    past and the present.

    Prerequisites: HART-100

    Lecture
    Fall
  
  •  

    HART400 Directed Study in Art History 3 cr.


    Directed Study is designed to provide students with the opportunity to pursue an independent art area. Typically, the end result of this project would be a research paper of 30 plus pages, or the equivalent, as agreed upon by the faculty member supervising the project. A Directed Study is a 3-credit course. Because of their advanced nature, Directed Studies courses are open only to seniors, and are limited to one per semester. No more than two Directed Studies may be counted toward degree requirements. You must fill out and return a Directed Study form with a complete description of the project including a bibliography, and a description of the final project. You must also register for the Directed Study.

    Prerequisites: By Permission of Instructor

    Fall/Spring
  
  •  

    HART403 Archaeological Theory and Practice 3 cr.


    An introduction to applied archaeology as a preparation for participation in an archeological excavation. Investigation of archeological theory including history, purposes, goals, and ethics of excavation.

    Prerequisites: HART100 and any 200 or 300 level HART course

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse and Sustainabilty Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART404 Protection of Cultural Heritage 3 cr.


    Examination of the forces that threaten the world’s shared artistic, architectural, and archaeological heritage, and discussion of the practical and theoretical responses to deal with these threats. Class readings and discussion will focus on threats from looting, collecting, museums, and armed conflict. For Art History majors only.

    Prerequisites: HART100 and any 200 or 300 level HART course

    Departmental Elective
  
  •  

    HART406 Tutankhamun Senior Seminar 3cr


    For many, the tomb of the 18th Dynasty pharaoh
    Tutankhamun is the most spectacular
    archaeological discovery of modern times.  With
    its inner coffin and burial mask of solid gold,
    and rich gold jewelry, it exemplifies for the
    public the rewards of archaeology, and new
    publications on Tut regularly feature the word
    “treasures” in their titles.  The significance of
    the tomb reaches far beyond the scrap value of
    its precious metals, however.  As the only
    Egyptian royal burial that has survived
    reasonably intact, it is a unique cultural
    document that will yield its “treasures” most
    completely if all of its contents are studied
    together.  Though the publication of the tomb is
    still far from complete, enough is available to
    enable us to reconstruct a general view of its
    contents.  The focus of the course will be on the
    documentary value of the tomb for our
    understanding of royal mortuary practice, the
    Egyptian perception of kingship, luxury craft
    production, regional interconnections, and the
    modern construction of ancient Egyptian culture.

    Prerequisites: HART-100

    Seminar
    Spring
  
  •  

    HART440 Seminar: When Worlds Collide: Aztecs at the Conquest and Beyond 3 cr.


    The 1521 Spanish conquest of the Aztec of Mexico forged a new world from a monumental collision of religions, philosophies and visual cultures. Through critical reading, research and oral and written presentation of 10-12 page papers, students in this seminar explore the power and paradoxes of Aztec civilization before and in the wake of conquest through examination of Aztec art and documentary sources including pictorial manuscripts and codices, sculpture, painting and architecture. Students also analyze first-hand accounts, memoirs and philosophical treatises recording Spanish conquistadors’ and clergies’ ambivalent responses to Aztec culture, to its sophistication and to its seeming barbarity. The influence of Aztec art on modernism in Mexico, North America and Europe also will be a focus of student discussion and research.

    Prerequisites: HART100 and any 200 or 300 level HART course; Art of Mesoamerica and/or Maya Art &Architecture (recommended, not required)

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART455 Cultural Crossings: China and Japan after 1840 3 cr.


    This seminar is a critical examination of the visual cultures created in China and Japan after the events of the Opium War and Matthew Perry encounters. The visual cultural crossing between the West and East and between China and Japan is an important part of the developing inter-civilizations in the global age.

    Prerequisites: HART100 and any 200 or 300 level HART course

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective
  
  •  

    HART490 The Methodologies of the History of Art 3 cr.


    This seminar explores the different ways of seeing, thinking, and writing about art and the history of art. Topics include: art historical narratives, history of form and style, iconology, psychology and art, biography and autobiography of artists, sociopolitical histories of art, gendered histories of art, semiotics— structuralism and deconstruction, post-colonialism, and museology. Students are exposed to the problems of why art changes over time, the hermeneutic challenge to interpret the meaning of arts of various cultures, and how art historians’ own perspectives shape the narratives of the history of art.

    Prerequisites: HART100 and any 200 or 300 level HART course

    Lecture/Seminar
    Culturally Diverse Content
    All College Elective

Illustration

  
  •  

    CDIL205 Media Techniques 3 cr.


    An introduction to the practical application of a range of Illustration materials with a focus on water-based paint media. Through demonstrations, in-class exercises and comparative assignments, students build technical skills and increase knowledge of color in applied problems.

    Prerequisites: SFDN181, SFDN185

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Departmental Requirement
    Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    CDIL208 Digital Illustration 3 cr.


    This course explores digital imaging using scanners, drawing tablets, digital cameras, Photoshop and Illustrator for the Macintosh. Concept-driven assignments have strong drawing components.

    Prerequisites: SFDN181, SFDN185

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Departmental Requirement
    Fall/Spring
  
  •  

    CDIL211 Human Figure in Illustration 3 cr.


    By drawing the human figure in a variety of situations, students explore basic anatomy. Assignments include use of figure or anatomical drawing in professional practice situations.

    Prerequisites: SFDN181, SFDN185

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Culturally Diverse Content
    Departmental Requirement
    Fall/Spring
  
  •  

    CDIL214 Drawing: Observation to Concept 3 cr.


    The course stresses the process of working with dry media techniques (graphite, pastel, colored pencil. scratchboard) basic drawing skills, and2D principles to render concepts. Visual, metaphors are explored by manipulating the contexts and relationships of objects and figures.

    Prerequisites: SFDN181 and SFDN185

    Critique
    Departmental Elective
    Fall/Spring
  
  •  

    CDIL215 Sophomore Illustration 3 cr.


    An introduction to professional illustration with emphasis on drawing and painting from observation. Assignments will introduce students to a variety of illustration venues including book, editorial, and product illustration while exploring the visual methods of color and composition as precise visual tools.

    Prerequisites: Take 9 credits from CDIL-205, CDIL-20, CDIL-211 CDIL-214,
    CDIL-216

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Culturally Diverse Content
    Departmental Requirement
    Spring
  
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    CDIL216 Color for Illustrators 3 cr.


    Color is a powerful aspect of an illustrator’s education. In response to this assertion, this studio course draws upon the understanding of color theory -though the steadfast focus remains on practical application, on tutoring intuition, heightening awareness, and refining skill. Through a practical exploration of theoretical/conceptual issues, students investigate the complexity and interrelatedness of elements of color - its perceptual, emotional/psychological, technical and aesthetic aspects. Students are required to complete a series of studio projects emphasizing the informed intuitive awareness, creative use, and practical application of color as a formal means of visual communication and expression for storytelling.

    Prerequisites: SFDN181 and SFDN185

    Hybrid Studio/Critique
    Culturally Diverse Content
    Departmental Requirement
    Fall/Spring
 

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